Brown sacrificed for the Lib Dems

“Cameron on the Brink of No10” screams the London Evening Standard. How things have turned in the space of an hour.

The duplicity of the Lib Dems is now all too evident for the country to see.

They have spent the weekend negotiating with the Conservatives when it was obvious to all that their obsession with proportional representation was never going to be accepted by the Conservatives.

Therefore, Clegg can now say that he has fulfilled his duty to speak to the biggest party when the whole exercise seems to have been a charade and a precursor to clearing the decks and starting full on negotiations with Labour.

For all Cameron’s efforts to want to deal with the economic problems, and Clegg making noises that he concurred, Britain is now at the whim of a party that saw its MPs decimated last Thursday when the Lib Dem intake of MPs was reduced from 62 to 57.

This reduction is not exactly a full-out endorsement of proportional representation and yet a discredited third party is now delaying the formation of government at a time of crisis, and all for wanting to change our voting system.

For all those who were wary of the Lib Dems before the election this is confirmation of how disingenuous the Lib Dems are and always have been; their whole raison d’etre has been to change the voting system to entrench themselves in power while allowing the BNP and other fascist parties, including those on the radical left, to also gain a presence in power.

I don’t blame the Conservatives for wanting to form a coalition with the Lib Dems, however distasteful that will be for the 10 million that voted Conservative last Thursday.

I don’t blame Brown or Labour for wanting to stick to power, as any politician would wish to do. Brown feels that he did as much as anyone ever could to keep this country out of an economic depression, after a recession that started in America.

It was Nick Clegg that called on the speaker, Michael Martin, to resign as if the Speaker was solely responsible for the whole expenses fiasco. Now Brown has also gone at his behest, as if one man is solely responsible for the economic crisis.

This is the same Nick Clegg who wishes to reduce Israel’s military capability when it fights Islamic radicals (Hamas) similar to those our troops are fighting in Afghanistan (Taleban).

I am not a Labour supporter but I have been shocked over the last few months by the vitriol commentators have aimed at Gordon Brown. The commentary of many has amounted to unadulterated bullying of a man who while fighting a general election has also had to run the country.

Under Brown and Blair we have become a more progressive society with the minimum wage and civil partnerships introduced.

Sadly, Brown has been remembered by all the pseudo-financial journalists for selling gold at a low, as if they themselves could have predicted the gold price rise to over $1000/ounce.

Meanwhile, Brown invested the proceeds in a weak Euro which has strengthened against the pound.

New Labour has run out of steam and it is time for a change to the Conservatives but for the country to be held to ransom by 57 people who haven’t tasted power for 70 years, and who are holding out solely for proportional representation at the expense of the British economy, brings British politics to a new, and sad, low.

Meanwhile, our next PM could end up being someone who was not involved in the televised debates, that seem to have taken on mythical proportions.

That is if it isn’t the great Nick Clegg, himself.

2 responses to “Brown sacrificed for the Lib Dems

  1. modernityblog

    Brown was always going to be a stumbling point, I suppose that the Lib Dems have hinted that they might be more amenable to any coalition/arrangement with someone/anyone else.

    I can see that point, Brown likes to do things in his own very particular way and his near deathbed conversion to electoral change was as fake as they come.

    The question is who next?

    My bet is on Ed Balls (not because I like him, in fact I positively loath New Labour), not any of the Milibands.

    They’ll be a few deals done, Brown wants to hand over to someone who he knows and can trust, that’s Ed Balls (or another New Labour loyalist).

    The stumbling block with the Tories is PR and the Lib Dems are a poisoned chalice in either case.

    If the Tories went in with the Lib Dems then that would potentially favour Labour in the next election, which would probably be called within a year.

    Equally any Lab-Lib government would probably be short lived, not do much and allow the Tories to regroup.

    So whilst the country might suffer under the Tories, it is politically shrewder if Labour let the Lib Dem aligned themselves with the Tories.

  2. Samuel Asher

    Does anyone talk of a unity government between Conservatives and Labor? Could it be that what people want, in a sort-of two headed election result, is for the two main parties to unite precisely for the purpose of solving the economic crisis?
    That is how I would interpret the election results.